header image

pankaj's blog

Information Overload in the Era of “Big Data”

Source: American Journal of Botany | Aug, 20, 2012

New search tools give scientists better ways of managing data

Botany is plagued by the same problem as the rest of science and society: our ability to generate data quickly and cheaply is surpassing our ability to access and analyze it. In this age of big data, scientists facing too much information rely on computers to search large data sets for patterns that are beyond the capability of humans to recognize—but computers can only interpret data based on the strict set of rules in their programming.

New tools called ontologies provide the rules computers need to transform information into knowledge, by attaching meaning to data, thereby making those data retrievable by computers and more understandable to human beings. Ontology, from the Greek word for the study of being or existence, traditionally falls within the purview of philosophy, but the term is now used by computer and information scientists to describe a strategy for representing knowledge in a consistent fashion. An ontology in this contemporary sense is a description of the types of entities within a given domain and the relationships among them.

A new article in this month’s American Journal of Botany by Ramona Walls (New York Botanical Garden) and colleagues describes how scientists build ontologies such as the Plant Ontology (PO) and how these tools can transform plant science by facilitating new ways of gathering and exploring data (http://www.amjbot.org/content/99/8/1263.full).

Jaiswal Lab receives US Department of Energy funding for building a Poplar Interactome.

Jaiswal lab at the Oregon State University is excited to share a good news on it’s new Poplar Interactome project. According to the press release by the Plant Feedstocks Genomics for Bioenergy research program of the USDA and DOE, the project was awarded funding from US Department of Energy (DOE). The project is lead by Pankaj Jaiswal and Palitha Dharmawardhana from our group at Oregon State University and Amy Brunner and Eric Beer of Virginia Tech.