Welcome! Our primary research focus is the study of flowering time and seed development in plants. These two processes determine reproductive timing and fruit/seed generation, contributing to human and animal nutritional needs by way of quality and yield. We examine these developmental features in the context of plant response under conditions of abiotic stress such as salt, drought and photoperiod. More info...


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Genome could unlock eucalyptus potential for paper, fuel and fiber

Source: OSU press release

In a collaborative effort spanning five continents, scientists have announced the complete sequencing of one of the world's most widely planted trees, Eucalyptus grandis.

Used for fuel and timber, the species commonly known as flooded gum or rose gum is valued for fast growth and straight grain. Often grown as a hybrid, it is one of more than 500 species of eucalyptus trees and shrubs that provide a renewable source of fiber, pulp, biofuel material, and medicinal and industrial oils.

The accomplishment was published today in the scientific journal Nature.

Triticum monococcum (Einkorn wheat) Transcriptome Assembly and Light Regulated Gene Expression Analyses.

Source: Department of Botany and Plant Pathology News

Common bread wheat with a genome that is ~5 times the size of the human genome is a hexaploid, with three times more number of chromosomes compared to ancestral diploid genomes. This means that the bread wheat combines three different genomes and can make studying the genetic makeup of modern wheat difficult. Therefore, "studying ancestral genomes such as the wheat A, B and D genomes individually provide a baseline reference and new opportunities to investigate the genetic contribution of each of these genomes that lead to the development of bread wheat”. “It also gives us an opportunity to identify novel and beneficial stress tolerant genes in the wild ancestral genomes, that can be introduced into common bread wheat for improving varieties” added Jaiswal.